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Mandela’s grandson enters fray, fights for Hajabi Major

The Xenophobic attacks in South Africa are also being exhibited on female Muslims in the army. The army in South Africa has backed a Colonel who sanctioned a Muslim woman for insisting on wearing her headscarf in the line of duty. The official had been harassing her and demanding that she remove her scarf while in uniform. Major Fatima works as a clinical forensic pathologist at the army’s 2 Military Hospital in Wynberg, and has since been charged with willful defiance and disobeying a lawful command. Mandla Mandela, a grandson of Nelson Mandela  and who is  also a Member of Parliament and traditional leader of the Royal House of Mandela, classified the sanction as  smudged of a witch hunt and denial of rights to manifest one’s religion.

Survivors of NZ terror attack appreciate Saudi King

Survivors of the recent terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, attended the last hajj courtesy King Salman, the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques.  Some of the survivors confessed the gesture had helped them to restore peace and deal with the effects of their ordeal. They travelled within the auspices of the Custodian of the two Holy Mosques’ Guests Program to Makkah for  the Hajj.

Sign of the times: China orders Arabic, Muslim symbols taken down

Authorities in China have ordered halal restaurants, food stalls and shops in Beijing,  the  capital to remove Arabic script and symbols associated with Islam from their signs as part of an expanding national effort to “Sinicize” its Muslim population. Images such as the crescent moon, Eastern-style domes on many mosques and the word “halal” written in Arabic, are particularly targeted for removal. The campaign against Arabic script and Islamic images marks a new phase of a drive that has gained momentum since 2016, aimed at ensuring religions conform to mainstream Chinese culture. Beijing is home to at least 1,000 halal shops and restaurants,

India criminalizes ‘triple talaq’ instant divorce

The Indian upper house of parliament has approved a bill to end the Muslim practice of instant “triple talaq” or divorce two years after the Supreme Court said it violated the constitutional rights of Muslim women. The upper house of parliament, Rajya Sabha, passed the Muslim Women (Protection of Rights on Marriage) Bill with a 99-84 approval, making the practice punishable with up to three years in jail. The passage of the bill was a victory for India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, who said the bill “corrects a historical wrong done to Muslim women”.

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Dutch former far-right politician converts to Islam

A former politician of the far-right Dutch PVV party has converted to Islam… Joram Van Klaveren told Dutch radio he made the switch while writing an anti-Islam book.”During that writing, I came across more and more things that made my view on Islam falter,” Van Klaveren said. He was a member of parliament for Geert Wilders Freedom Party (PVV), but left politics after he failed to win a seat in the 2017 national election.

The first woman in Denmark fined for wearing full-face veil

A 28-year-old woman wearing a full veil has become the first person in Denmark to be fined under a new ban which came into force recently..The woman came to police attention when a scuffle broke out between her and another woman at a shopping centre in the north-eastern region of the country. This was as a result of one woman trying to remove her hijab by force.   Police obtained CCTV footage of the incident and it shows during the fight, her niqab came off,

Saudi Arabia wants to enrich uranium for nuclear power

Saudi Arabia’s newly appointed energy minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said the kingdom is proceeding cautiously with its planned nuclear power program. Saudi Arabia has said it wants to tap nuclear technology for peaceful uses that will begin with two atomic reactors,. But enrichment of uranium is a sensitive step in the nuclear fuel cycle because it can open up the possibility of military uses of the material, the issue at the heart of Western and regional concerns over Iran’s atomic work.

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